Tour Spot

Location: Noakhali

Nijhum Dwip

A cluster of islands (mainly, Ballar Char, Kamlar Char, Char Osman and Char Muri) emerged in the early 1950s as an alluvium in the shallow estuary of the Bay of Bengal on the south of Noakhali. These new sandbanks first drew the notice of a group of fishermen, who named it Baular Char (literally, the alluvium of sand) later transformed into Ballar Char. Occupying an area of 14,050 acres (5,686 hectares), the island is situated between 21 0 1 / to 22 0 6 /North latitude and 90 0 3 / to 91 0 4 / East longitude

Migratory Birds in Nijhum Dwip: During winter, thousands of migratory birds flock in to island. The fishermen use the airy and sunny land as an ideal place for drying their catches from the sea. Sometimes many of them also construct straw huts on the island as seasonal residences.

In 1974 the Forest Department took an afforestation program for a duration of twenty years in the north side of the island. Covering an area of nine thousand acres, it has now developed into a deep forest with a variety of plant species. Among the trees Keora is much seen. Besides this Gewa, Kankra, Bain, Babul, Karamja, Pashur and many other species are seen.

On 8 April 2001 the government declared the 40,390 acres (16,345 ha) of forest of Jahajmara range including 9,550 acres (3,865 ha) of forest land on Nijhum Dwip as a National Park for the protection and development of the biodiversity of the forest. But in practice, there a very lazy appearance of that declaration.

On 8 April 2001 the government declared the 40,390 acres (16,345 ha) of forest of Jahajmara range including 9,550 acres (3,865 ha) of forest land on Nijhum Dwip as a National Park for the protection and development of the biodiversity of the forest. But in practice, there a very lazy appearance of that declaration.
On 8 April 2001 the government declared the 40,390 acres (16,345 ha) of forest of Jahajmara range including 9,550 acres (3,865 ha) of forest land on Nijhum Dwip as a National Park for the protection and development of the biodiversity of the forest. But in practice, there a very lazy appearance of that declaration.

On 8 April 2001 the government declared the 40,390 acres (16,345 ha) of forest of Jahajmara range including 9,550 acres (3,865 ha) of forest land on Nijhum Dwip as a National Park for the protection and development of the biodiversity of the forest. But in practice, there a very lazy appearance of that declaration.

Location: Chittagong

Sitakunda

Sitakunda (Bengali: সীতাকুণ্ড Shitakunḍo, IPA: [ʂit̪akunɖo]) is an upazila, or administrative unit, in the Chittagong District of Bangladesh. It includes one urban settlement, the Sitakunda Town, and 10 unions, the lowest of administrative units in Bangladesh. It is one of the 14 upazilas, the second tier of administrative units, of the Chittagong District, which also includes 12 thanas, the urban equivalent of upazilas. The district is part of the Chittagong Division, the highest order of administrative units in Bangladesh. Sitakunda is the home of the country's first eco-park, as well as alternative energy projects, specifically wind energy and geothermal power.

Sitakunda is one of the oldest sites of human habitation in Bangladesh. During much of its history, it was ruled alternatively by various Buddhist rulers of Myanmar in the east and Muslims rulers of Bengal in the west. For a brief period in the 8th century, it was ruled by the Buddhist Pala Empire of India. The eastern rulers originated from the Kingdom of Arakan, the Mrauk U dynasty, Arakanese pirates and the Pagan Kingdom. The western rulers came from the Sultanate of Bengal and the Mughal province (Suba) of Bangala. European rule of Sitakunda was heralded by Portuguese privateers in 16th and 17th centuries, who ruled together with the pirates; and the British Raj in 18th and 19th centuries, who unified Sitakunda into the rest of the Chittagong District. Omar Siddiqi is the Current Member of parliament of Sitakunda

Economic development in Sitakunda is largely driven by the Dhaka-Chittagong Highway and the railway. Though Sitakunda is predominantly an agricultural area, it also has the largest ship breaking industry in the world.[1][2] The industry has been accused of neglecting workers' rights, especially concerning work safety practices and child labor. It has also been accused of harming the environment, particularly by causing soil contamination. Sitakunda's ecosystems are further threatened by deforestation, over-fishing, and groundwater contamination. The upazila is also susceptible to natural hazards such as earthquakes, cyclones, and storm surges. It lies on one of the most active seismic faults in Bangladesh, the Sitakunda–Teknaf fault.

Sitakunda is renowned for its numerous Islamic, Hindu and Buddhist shrines. It has 280 mosques, 8 mazars, 49 Hindu temples, 4 ashrams, and 3 Buddhist temples. Among its notable religious sites are the Chandranath Temple (a Shakti Peetha or holy pilgrimage site), Vidarshanaram Vihara (founded by the scholar Prajnalok Mahasthavir), and the Hammadyar Mosque (founded by Sultan Ghiyasuddin Mahmud Shah). The attraction of Sitakunda as a tourist destination is elevated by these pilgrimage sites along with the hill range and the eco-park. Despite its diverse population, the area has gone through episodes of communal strife, including attacks on places of worship. There have been reports of activity by the Islamic militant group Jama'atul Mujahideen Bangladesh since the early 2000s.[3][4]

Location: Naogaon

Paharpur Buddha Bihar

A number of monasteries grew up during the Pāla period in ancient Bengal and Magadha. According to Tibetan sources, five great Mahaviharas stood out: Vikramashila, the premier university of the era; Nalanda, past its prime but still illustrious; Somapura Mahavihara; Odantapurā; and Jaggadala.[2] The monasteries formed a network; "all of them were under state supervision" and there existed "a system of co-ordination among them ... it seems from the evidence that the different seats of Buddhist learning that functioned in eastern India under the Pāla were regarded together as forming a network, an interlinked group of institutions," and it was common for great scholars to move easily from position to position among them.[3]

The excavation at Paharpur, and the finding of seals bearing the inscription Shri-Somapure-Shri-Dharmapaladeva-Mahavihariyarya-bhiksu-sangghasya, has identified the Somapura Mahavihara as built by the second Pala king Dharmapala (circa 781–821) of Pāla Dynasty.[4] Tibetan sources, including Tibetan translations of Dharmakayavidhi and Madhyamaka Ratnapradipa, Taranatha's history and Pag-Sam-Jon-Zang, mention that Dharmapala's successor Devapala (circa 810–850) built it after his conquest of Varendra.[4] The Paharpur pillar inscription bears the mention of 5th regnal year of Devapala's successor Mahendrapala (circa 850–854) along with the name of Bhiksu Ajayagarbha.Taranatha's Pag Sam Jon Zang records that the monastery was repaired during the reign of Mahipala (circa 995–1043 AD).

The Nalanda inscription of Vipulashrimitra records that the monastery was destroyed by fire, which also killed Vipulashrimitra's ancestor Karunashrimitra, during a conquest by the Vanga army in the 11th century.

Over time Atish's spiritual preceptor, Ratnakara Shanti, served as a sthavira of the vihara, Mahapanditacharya Bodhibhadra served as a resident monk, and other scholars spent part of their lives at the monastery, including Kalamahapada, Viryendra and Karunashrimitra.[4] Many Tibetan monks visited the Somapura between the 9th and 12th centuries.

During the rule of the Sena dynasty, known as Karnatadeshatagata Brahmaksatriya, in the second half of the 12th century the vihara started to decline for the last time.[4] One scholar writes, "The ruins of the temple and monasteries at Pāhāpur do not bear any evident marks of large-scale destruction. The downfall of the establishment, by desertion or destruction, must have been sometime in the midst of the widespread unrest and displacement of population consequent on the Muslim invasion."[5]

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

A copperplate dated to 159 Gupta Era (479 AD) discovered in 1927 in the northeast corner of the monastery, mentions donation of a Brahmin couple to Jain Acharya Guhanandi of Pancha-stupa Nikaya at Vata Gohli, identifiable as the neighbouring village of Goalapara

Location: Kuakata

Beach

Kuakata offers a full view of the sunrise and sunset from the same white sandy beach in the water of the Bay of Bengal. Locally known as Shagor Kannya (Daughter of Ocean), the long strip of dark, marbled sand stretches for about 18 kilometres (11 mi). The long, wide beach at Kuakata has a typical natural setting. This sandy beach has gentle slopes into the Bay of Bengal. Kuakata is also a sanctuary for migratory winter birds.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On 13 September 2007 the government had announced a red alert in Kuakata as caution for a possible tsunami.

Location: Jaflong

Forestation program

Jaflong is a hill station and popular tourist destination in the Division of Sylhet, Bangladesh. It is located in Gowainghat Upazila of Sylhet District and situated at the border between Bangladesh and the Indian state of Meghalaya, overshadowed by subtropical mountains and rainforests. Jaflong is famous for its stone collections and is home of the Khasi tribe

In early 2005, Laskar Muqsudur Rahman, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Sylhet Forest Division, observed that Jaflong that he heard in his boyhood as the 'lungs' of Greater Sylhet was at stake due to on going encroachments and establishment of unauthorized stone crushing mills. He took initiatives to recover the land and establish a recreation-cum-botanical park named as 'Jaflong Green Park'. The first foundation stone for the thematic Green Park at Jaflong was laid by Laskar Muqsudur Rahman, Deputy Conservator of Forests in 2005 with the cooperation of local forest staffs led by Forest Ranger Mohammad Ali. Nonetheless, at the inception it was a challenging task due to local conflicts and procedural constraints. The forestation program in Jaflong Green Park has been started under supervision of the joint forces, Jaflong Foundation and Forest Department. They have jointly taken up the forestation program with about 100 hectares of grabbed land. Under the forestation program, various types of trees, including hybrid Akash-moni, are being planted in the park to maintain ecological balance

Jaflong is a hill station and popular tourist destination in the Division of Sylhet, Bangladesh. It is located in Gowainghat Upazila of Sylhet District and situated at the border between Bangladesh and the Indian state of Meghalaya, overshadowed by subtropical mountains and rainforests. Jaflong is famous for its stone collections and is home of the Khasi tribe

Jaflong is a hill station and popular tourist destination in the Division of Sylhet, Bangladesh. It is located in Gowainghat Upazila of Sylhet District and situated at the border between Bangladesh and the Indian state of Meghalaya, overshadowed by subtropical mountains and rainforests. Jaflong is famous for its stone collections and is home of the Khasi tribe
Jaflong is a hill station and popular tourist destination in the Division of Sylhet, Bangladesh. It is located in Gowainghat Upazila of Sylhet District and situated at the border between Bangladesh and the Indian state of Meghalaya, overshadowed by subtropical mountains and rainforests. Jaflong is famous for its stone collections and is home of the Khasi tribe

Location: Bangkok

Zoo

A zoo (short for zoological garden or zoological park and also called an animal park or menagerie) is a facility in which animals are housed within enclosures, displayed to the public, and in which they may also breed.

The term "zoological garden" refers to zoology, the study of animals, a term deriving from the Greek zōon (ζῷον, 'animal') and lógos (λóγος, 'study'). The abbreviation "zoo" was first used of the London Zoological Gardens, which was opened for scientific study in 1828 and to the public in 1857.[1] The number of major animal collections open to the public around the world now exceeds to 1,000, around 80 percent of them are in cities.[2] In the United States of America alone, zoos are visited by over 180 million people annually




The Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo is a crocodile zoo in Bangkok, Thailand. The park claims to hold the world's largest crocodile in captivity, named Yai, measuring 6 m (19 ft 8 in) and weighing 1,114 kg (2,456 lb).[1] Yai is one among over 100,000 crocodiles at the farm.

Visitors to the crocodile farm can see a wide variety of animals other than crocodiles, including elephants, lions, tigers, monkeys, horses and hippos. There are daily crocodile shows, famous for the performers doing tricks such as putting their heads and arms inside a crocodile's mouth. Elephant shows display the dexterity of elephants as they walk tightropes, ride skateboards and dance. Visitors may also take short elephant ride, ride a train, enjoy a paddle boat ride or explore the dinosaur museum.

Admission for non Thai adults is 300 baht. Admission for children is 200 baht. Thai nationals pay 60 baht admission. Foreign looking residents of Thailand still pay 300 baht. The Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm is located at 555 Moo 7 Taiban Road, Taiban Sub-District, Amphur Muang, Samutprakarn, Thailand. Opening hours are from 8:00 A.M. through 6:00 P.M. daily


London Zoo, which opened in 1826, was initially known as the "Gardens and Menagerie of the Zoological Society of London", and it described itself as a menagerie or "zoological forest".[4] The abbreviation "zoo" first appeared in print in the United Kingdom around 1847, when it was used for the Clifton Zoo, but it was not until some 20 years later that the shortened form became popular in the song "Walking in the Zoo" by music-hall artist Alfred Vance.[4] The term "zoological park" was used for more expansive facilities in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Washington, D.C., and the Bronx in New York, which opened in 1847, 1891 and 1899 respectively.[5]

Relatively new terms for zoos coined in the late 20th century are "conservation park" or "biopark". Adopting a new name is a strategy used by some zoo professionals to distance their institutions from the stereotypical and nowadays criticized zoo concept of the 19th century.[6] The term "biopark" was first coined and developed by the National Zoo in Washington D.C. in the late 1980s.[7] In 1993, the New York Zoological Society changed its name to the Wildlife Conservation Society and rebranded the zoos under its jurisdiction as "wildlife conservation parks".

London Zoo, which opened in 1826, was initially known as the "Gardens and Menagerie of the Zoological Society of London", and it described itself as a menagerie or "zoological forest".[4] The abbreviation "zoo" first appeared in print in the United Kingdom around 1847, when it was used for the Clifton Zoo, but it was not until some 20 years later that the shortened form became popular in the song "Walking in the Zoo" by music-hall artist Alfred Vance.[4] The term "zoological park" was used for more expansive facilities in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Washington, D.C., and the Bronx in New York, which opened in 1847, 1891 and 1899 respectively.[5]

Relatively new terms for zoos coined in the late 20th century are "conservation park" or "biopark". Adopting a new name is a strategy used by some zoo professionals to distance their institutions from the stereotypical and nowadays criticized zoo concept of the 19th century.[6] The term "biopark" was first coined and developed by the National Zoo in Washington D.C. in the late 1980s.[7] In 1993, the New York Zoological Society changed its name to the Wildlife Conservation Society and rebranded the zoos under its jurisdiction as "wildlife conservation parks".

Location: Nepal

Lumphini Park

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Named after the Buddha's place of birth in Nepal, Lumphini Park is the best way to escape Bangkok without actually leaving town. Shady paths, a large artificial lake and swept lawns temporarily blot out the roaring traffic and hulking concrete towers.

There are paddleboats for lovers, playgrounds for the kids and enormous monitor lizards for the whole family. One of the best times to visit the park is before 7am, when the air is fresh (well, relatively so for Bangkok) and legions of Thai-Chinese are practising t'ai chi. The park reawakens with the evening's cooler temperatures – aerobics classes collectively sweat to a techno soundtrack. Late at night the borders of the park are frequented by streetwalking prostitutes, both male and female.

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Lumphini Park (also Lumpini or Lumpinee, Thai: สวนลุมพินี) is a 360 rai (57.6-hectare (142-acre)) park in Bangkok, Thailand. The park offers rare open public space, trees, and playgrounds in the Thai capital and contains an artificial lake where visitors can rent boats. Paths around the park totalling approximately 2.5 km in length are a popular area for morning and evening joggers. Officially, cycling is only permitted during the day between the times of 10:00 to 15:00. There is a smoking ban throughout the park. Dogs are not allowed.

Location: Cox's Bazar

History

The greater Chittagong area, including Cox's Bazar, was under the rule of Arakan kings from the early 9th century until its conquest by the Mughals in 1666 AD.[9] When the Mughal Prince Shah Shuja was passing through the hilly terrain of the present-day Cox's Bazar on his way to Arakan, he was attracted to its scenic and captivating beauty. He commanded his forces to camp there. His retinue of one thousand palanquins stopped there for some time. A place named Dulahazara, meaning "one thousand palanquins," still exists in the area. After the Mughals, the place came under the control of the Tipras and the Arakanese, followed by the Portuguese and then the British.

The name Cox's Bazar originated from the name of a British East India Company officer, Captain Hiram Cox, who was appointed as the Superintendent of Palonki (today's Cox's Bazar) outpost. He succeeded Warren Hastings, who became the Governor of Bengal following the British East India Company Act in 1773. The Captain rehabilitated many refugees in the area, but died in 1799 before he could finish his work. To commemorate him, a market was established and named after him, called Cox's Bazar. Cox's Bazar then was first established in 1854 and became a municipality in 1869.[9]

After the Sepoy Mutiny (Indian Rebellion of 1857) in 1857, the British East India Company was highly criticised and questioned on humanitarian grounds, specially for its opium trade monopoly over the Indian Sub-Continent. However, after its dissolution on 1 January 1874, all of the company's assets including its Armed Forces were acquired by the British Crown. After this historic take over, Cox's Bazar was declared a district of the Bengal Province under the British Crown.

After the end of British rule in 1947, Cox's Bazar became part of East Pakistan. Captain Advocate Fazlul Karim, the first chairman (after independence from the British) of Cox's Bazar Municipality, established the Tamarisk Forest along the beach. He wanted to attract tourists as well as to protect the beach from tsunami. He donated much of his father-in-law's and his own lands as sites for constructing a Public Library and a Town Hall. He was inspired to build Cox's Bazar as a tourist spot after seeing beaches of Bombay and Karachi, and was a resort pioneer in developing Cox's Bazar as a destination. He founded a Maternity Hospital, the Stadium and the drainage system by procuring grants from the Ford Foundation and Rockefeller Foundation through correspondence. T. H. Matthews, the principal of the Dacca Engineering College (1949~1954), was a friend who had helped him in these fundraising efforts. Engineer Chandi Charan Das was the government civil engineer who had worked on all these projects. In 1959 the municipality was turned into a town committee.[9]

In 1961 the Geological Survey of Pakistan initiated investigation of radioactive minerals like monazite around the Cox's Bazar sea-beach area.[10]


Cox's Bazar Bus Terminal
In 1971, Cox's Bazar wharf was used as a naval port by the Pakistan Navy's gunboats. This and the nearby airstrip of the Pakistan Air Force were the scene of intense shelling by the Indian Navy during the Bangladesh Liberation War. During the war, Pakistani soldiers killed many people in the town, including eminent lawyer Jnanendralal Chowdhury. The killing of two freedom fighters named Farhad and Subhash at Badar Mokam area is also recorded in history.[7]

After the independence of Bangladesh, Cox's Bazar started to get administrative attention. In 1972 the town committee of Cox's Bazar was turned into a municipality. In 1975, The Government of Bangladesh established a pilot plant at Kalatali.[10] Later, in 1984 Cox's Bazar subdivision was promoted to a district, and five years later (in 1989) the Cox's Bazar municipality was elevated to B-grade.[9] In 1994 (jobs) the Marine Fisheries and Technology Station (MFTS) was established at Cox's Bazar. MFTS is a research station of Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute (BFRI) headquartered in Mymensingh. The station covers a land area of four hectares and contains five laboratories.[11] In April 2007 Bangladesh got connected to the submarine cable network as a member of the SEA-ME-WE-4 Consortium, as Cox's Bazar was selected as the landing station of the submarine cable.[12] In September 2012 the municipality was the site of the Cox's Bazar and Ramu riots, where local Muslims attacked the Buddhist community over an alleged Quran desecration posted to Facebook.[13]

Location: Bandarban

children do not get first choice

About 14,000 children have missed out on their first choice of primary school in London, figures reveal.

Across the city's 33 council areas, 86% got into their first choice of school. Overall, the number of applications was down by 4% to 98,944.

The Pan London Admissions Board said pressure for places remained high despite the slight drop in applications.

The national figure will not be announced for several weeks.

The London figures also show that overall, 96% of children received an offer from one of their top three preferred schools. Last year, it was 94%.

The areas with the highest number of first preference admissions were Barking and Dagenham (93%), Newham (92%) and Bexley (91%), while Kensington and Chelsea (68%), Hammersmith and Fulham (76%) and Harrow (79%) had the lowest.

'Considerable growth'

The admissions board said the variation in boroughs was because the city had such a dense population and that while some schools might not have offered many first preferences, they may have a high proportion of first preferences for pupils from neighbouring boroughs because schools were situated near borough boundaries.

It said some parents may also choose to select a school their child was unlikely to receive an offer for.

Sara Williams, chair of the Pan London Admissions Board, said: "The demand for primary school places in London remains high, having increased by 5% since 2011.

"Overall there has been a slight fall in demand for reception places since last year, but the pressure on London schools to deliver places for children across the capital due to start school this September remains.

"We will be keeping an eye on birth rates and patterns of population growth, but we expect demand for primary school places to continue at least at current levels and demand for secondary school places to grow considerably in the years ahead."

Location: rangamati

Campus News

The school resumed then in 1889 and Father Francis Boeres CSC took the charge of the school. Within twenty years, he set the school upon its solid foundation by his untiring efforts. The school was initially used to teach only Eurasian and European children. Indian students were only allowed under special permission and that was only fifteen percent. In 1898 there were six Bengali boys and two Bengali girls among the students. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. In 1924 Board’s recognition St. Gregory’s High School established by Rev. Father Gregory De Groote, a Benedictine Priest in January 1882 set many historical records towards its journey of education as well as humanitarian activities. The school came into being with a handful of boys. But soon school had to be closed down twice. The school resumed then in 1889 and Father Francis Boeres CSC took the charge of the school. Within twenty years, he set the school upon its solid foundation by his untiring efforts.

The school was initially used to teach only Eurasian and European children. Indian students were only allowed under special permission and that was only fifteen percent. In 1898 there were six Bengali boys and two Bengali girls among the students. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. a Benedictine Priest in January 1882 set many historical records towards its journey of education as well as humanitarian activities. The school came into being with a handful of boys. But soon school had to be closed down twice. The school resumed then in 1889

Location: Rangamati

Sajek

In 1898 there were six Bengali boys and two Bengali girls among the students. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. a Benedictine Priest in January 1882 set many historical records towards its journey of education as well as humanitarian activities. The school came into being with a handful of boys. But soon school had to be closed down twice. The school resumed then in 1889 and Father Francis Boeres CSC took the charge of the school. Within twenty years, he set the school upon its solid foundation by his untiring efforts. The school was initially used to teach only Eurasian and European children. Indian students were only allowed under special permission and that was only fifteen percent. In 1898 there were In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. In 1924 Board’s recognition St. Gregory’s High School established by Rev. Father Gregory De Groote, a Benedictine Priest in January 1882 set many historical records towards its journey of education as well as humanitarian activities. The school came into being with a handful of boys. But soon school had to be closed down twice. The school resumed then in 1889 and Father Francis Boeres CSC took the charge of the school. Within twenty years, he set the school upon its solid foundation by his untiring efforts. The school was initially used to teach only Eurasian and European children. Indian students were only allowed under special permission and that was only fifteen percent. In 1898 there were six Bengali boys and two Bengali girls among the students. In 1912 the girls section was separated from the boys and St. Francis Xavier’s came into existence. a Benedictine Priest in January 1882 set many historical records towards its journey of education as well as humanitarian activities.


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Sajek Valley
Sajek Valley is an emerging tourist spot in Bangladesh situated among the hills of Kasalong range of mountains in Sajek union, Baghaichhari Upazila in
3 KB (376 words) - 22:18, 26 January 2018
Rangamati Hill District (section Sajek valley)
Bagaichhari Upazila Baghaichari Bangaltali Khedarmara Marishya Rupakari Sajek Sarbotali Barkal Upazila Aimachara Baraharina Barkal Bhushonchara Subalong
18 KB (1,629 words) - 04:54, 6 January 2018
Rangamati
Marma etc.), its flora and fauna, indigenous museum, hanging bridge etc. Sajek Vallery Kaptai Lake Lower portion of the Shuvolong Fall
8 KB (238 words) - 06:52, 11 December 2017
Bagaichhari Upazila
The 8 Unions are: Baghaichari Bangaltali Khedarmara Marishya Rupakari Sajek Sarbotali Amtoli Upazilas of Bangladesh Districts of Bangladesh Divisions
3 KB (172 words) - 07:42, 5 May 2017
Baghaichari Union
of 11,004.22 acres. It is bordered by the Marishya Union to the north, Sajek Union and Mizoram (India) to the east, Sarbotali Union to the south, and
2 KB (236 words) - 15:44, 9 March 2016
Bengal
different indigenous tribes Rangamati, Khagrachhari, Bandarban A view of Sajek, Rangamati Ratargul only swamp forest in Bengal region Sylhet A
105 KB (10,155 words) - 17:02, 11 February 2018
NANOS1
1371/journal.pone.0053443. PMC 3540065 . PMID 23320086. Kusz-Zamelczyk K, Sajek M, Spik A, Glazar R, Jędrzejczak P, Latos-Bieleńska A, Kotecki M, Pawelczyk
4 KB (504 words) - 02:12, 25 October 2017
Operation Searchlight
billeted. Other 14th Wing companies were deployed at Ramgarh, Taindong and Sajek, to the north and east of Chittagong. 17th wing had 2 companies at Kaptai
143 KB (21,006 words) - 17:01, 5 February 2018
Index of Sri Lanka-related articles (S)
Thirumeni Saiye, Burma Sajan Fernando Sajeewa Weerakoon Sajeewa de Silva Sajek Valley Sajil Sreedhar Sajin Vass Gunawardena Sajith Dissanayaka Sajith Fernando
93 KB (10,349 words) - 19:41, 30 January 2018
PBA Bowling Tour: 1984 Season
(2) Meister Brau Open Buckeye Lanes North Olmsted, Ohio Feb 20–25 Rickie Sajek (1) Toledo Trust PBA National Championship Imperial Lanes Toledo, Ohio Feb
7 KB (257 words) - 23:51, 5 September 2015


Location: Sonargaon

RESCUE CHILDREN

Children are divine. They are the son of God. They are signs of goodness, innocence and future. We need to pass our dreams to their hands. They will maintain our glory and we should show them high hope.

But the fact is there are so many infants, orphan, under-privileged, abandoned children in our society. They are hopeless and their future is uncertain. So many of them work in street, in industry, in the farm and in homes. Their life is miserable.

They have no education, no food, and no proper cloth. They are departed from their own society. It is so pathetic. Studies show that among all species, the most vulnerable section is poor infants and children.


If we look at the society we can see that in the same society children of different background have different opportunities. Children from the rich family has better life prospect. But the children of the rural areas and poor backgrounds are unwanted, unprivileged and enjoy unequal opportunities, and this gap is growing more and more.

Children are the angel. You even can't think what a little child imagines every time. This little bird is thinking every impossible thing. They have infinite potentialities. But without due care, this treasure cannot be discovered and it is not possible in a society which is full of inequality, injustice and unfairness.


Every child deserves to have a normal childhood free from destruction, a safe place to live. We need universal reform for those child rights. We need rescue education program to prevent them from slave labour, poverty, extreme hardship and destitution.

We need national and international resolution or guideline to support them. We need more international response in relation to this matter. We need some great heroes in every society for infant’s and children’s care; because they are the greatest resource of all nations.

We know from our experience that political solutions do not last; but it is also true that a country cannot be developed, keeping greater parts of its children behind from nation building process. We need supports to and programs to prevent them. It is very urgent calling to focus on creating opportunities and prospects for them for the sake of their lives, home and community. A strong collective consensus and public investment is required to ensure their safety and security.

We cannot forget that one third of our population is children and they are our future. They are the souls of our society and they are the God's opinion. Nelson Mendela once said "There can be no keener revelation of a society's soul than the way in which it treats its children." So, we need to save our souls and this is the most urgent appeal to humanity.

Thanks
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