Beach

Kuakata

Kuakata offers a full view of the sunrise and sunset from the same white sandy beach in the water of the Bay of Bengal. Locally known as Shagor Kannya (Daughter of Ocean), the long strip of dark, marbled sand stretches for about 18 kilometres (11 mi). The long, wide beach at Kuakata has a typical natural setting. This sandy beach has gentle slopes into the Bay of Bengal. Kuakata is also a sanctuary for migratory winter birds.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On the eastern end of the beach is Gongamati Reserved Forest, an evergreen mangrove forest and snippet of the original Kuakata. (When the Rakhines settled in the area in 1784, Kuakata was part of the larger Sundarbans forest. However, the Sundarbans is one-hour away by speed boat.) As a mangrove forest, Gongamati, like the Sundarbans, offers some protection against tidal surges. However, it too is being threatened by logging and deforestation. The best way to reach the forest is by foot or bike along the beach, where flag-flying fishing boats can be seen trawling the coast. Visiting Gangamati in the late afternoon is a perfect time to watch the sun cast shadows on the exposed mangrove roots.

On 13 September 2007 the government had announced a red alert in Kuakata as caution for a possible tsunami.